Teachers Visit Water Waste Facility

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Tour Guide

Science Teachers at the Water Waste Plant

Nikki Honda, Staff Writer

Science Department teachers visited a water waste plant to more accurately incorporate into their curriculum new information about how water is currently being treated.

On November 2, teachers Roxanna Jackman, Amanda Renno, Jane Kelson, Rachel Eaton, Rene Gillibert, Nita Madra, Patrick Wildermuth, Tren Kauzer, and Sarah Marheine traveled to the Central Contra Costa Water Sanitary District. Wildermuth said the purpose was to “clue in the rest of the teachers about what is going on in the biology classes and to see if our simulation mirrors what actually takes place.”

Biology students have a waste water simulation in the spring, to study what happens when water goes to the treatment plant. They use the same process to see how clean water can be put in the bay without damaging the ecosystem.

Wildermuth said, “The biology teachers are all familiar with the simulation but wanted the teachers who teach classes beyond biology to see what they could use in their classes.”

Biology teachers wanted to see if their simulation mirrors what actually takes place at the plant. Biology teacher Tren Kauzer said he learned, “things go down the drain that can’t be pulled out. The chemicals can’t be taken out of the water and it’s really sad.” Kauzer plans on changing his in-class simulation to ensure its accuracy.

Wildermuth said he will remind his environmental science class of their water waste simulation and will “also talk about job opportunities available for scientists.”

After visiting the plant, science teacher and trip coordinator, Jackman said she is “really proud we live in a place with no violations. The treatment facility puts good water back into the bay. They do a great job.”

A guide gave teachers a three-hour tour of the treatment facility. The tour also included a recycle center where paints and batteries are be disposed. The center collects paint and then recycles it for free. Wildermuth said it was a “good recycle program for pesticides and chemicals.”